My Classics Club list

So as I wrote a couple of days ago, I have decided to join The Classics Club. Below you’ll find my list of the 50 books I pledge to read before September 2017. It’s a bit scary to create such a list because my intention is to try and stick to it and actually get these books read. I started with listing the books I already own that qualify for this club – 25 books in all (one of these is a reread). And then came the trickier part – going through my wish list of 1000+ books and determining the last 25 books…

There was some titles I immediately knew I wanted to include – like Ray Bradbury Fahrenheit 451 and Dumas The Count de Monte Christo. But then I just went through my wish list, added the books I felt for. I have to admit that apparently, not that many classics have spoken to me. I only ended up with a list of 55 novels – so 30 novels out of my 1000+ wish list are what I determine classics…! That’s just sad! If I had known that, I probably would have joined The Classics Club a lot sooner to get more recommendations…!

But anyway, here’s my list. I haven’t paid attention to making sure both men and women are included or that all the authors aren’t ‘old white men’  but I still have a bit of everything, I think. The last to be included was Ernest Hemingway – I’ve been putting of reading him for so long, him being this big game hunter who drank too much, but I’m slowly coming to the realization that I might actually still like some of his works… So I kicked Mervyn Peake off the list and added Hemingway.

Here’s the list – deadline: September 2017:

  1. Richard Adams: Watership Down. (Own collection)
  2. Chinua Achebe: Things Fall Apart
  3. Jane Austen: Northhanger Abbey. (Own collection)
  4. Paul Auster: The New York Trilogy. (Own collection)
  5. Frank L. Baum: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
  6. Karen Blixen: Out of Africa. (Own collection)
  7. Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451
  8. Frances Hodgson Burnett: A Little Princess
  9. William Burroughs: Naked Lunch. (Own collection)
  10. A.S. Byatt: Possession. (Own collection)
  11. Lewis Carroll: Alice in Wonderland. (Own collection)
  12. Lewis Carroll: Through the Looking Glass. (Own collection)
  13. Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra: Don Quixote (Own collection)
  14. Wilkie Collins: The Moonstone
  15. Charles Dickens: Nicholas Nickleby. (Own collection)
  16. Charles Dickens: A Tale of Two Cities. (Own collection)
  17. Fyodor Dostoevsky: The Idiot. (Own collection)
  18. Fyodor Dostoevsky: Crime and Punishment. (Own collection)
  19. Theodore Dreiser: An American Tragedy
  20. Alexander Dumas: The Count of Monte Christo
  21. Umberto Eco: The Name of the Rose. (Own collection)
  22. George Elliot: The Mill on the Floss
  23. Sebastian Faulks: Birdsong
  24. F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby. (Own collection)
  25. Kenneth Grahame: The Wind in the Willows. (Own collection)
  26. Graham Greene: The Power and the Glory
  27. Graham Greene: The End of the Affair
  28. Alex Haley: Roots
  29. Thomas Hardy: The Mayor of Casterbridge
  30. Thomas Hardy: Tess of the D’Urbervilles
  31. Ernest Hemingway: A Farewell to Arms
  32. Frank Herbert: Dune. (Own collection)
  33. Victor Hugo: Les Misérables. (Own collection)
  34. Henry James: The Portrait of a Lady
  35. Christopher Isherwood: A Single Man
  36. James Joyce: Ulysses. (Own collection)
  37. Mario Vargas Llosa: Conversations in a Chatedral
  38. Gabriel García Márques: One Hundred Years of Solitude. (Own collection)
  39. Carson McCullers: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
  40. Toni Morrison: Beloved
  41. Marcel Proust: In Remembrance of Things Past. (Own collection – I’m not sure if the edition I’m reading is being published and I don’t know if the last volume is finished in 5 years but I’ll try to finish as much of it as is published.)
  42. Salman Rushdie: Midnight’s Children. (Own colletion)
  43. John Steinbeck: Of Mice and Men
  44. J.R.R. Tolkien: Lord of the Rings. (Own collection – reread)
  45. Evelyn Waugh: Brideshead Revisited. (Own collection)
  46. Thornton Wilder: The Bridge of San Luis Rey
  47. Edith Wharton: The Age of Innocence
  48. Virginia Woolf: Orlando. (Own collection)
  49. Richard Yates: Revolutionary Road
  50. Émile Zola: Thérèse Raquin

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9 thoughts on “My Classics Club list

  1. Nice list! And, I tried to read Mervyn Peake a little while back and it was horrible. You’re not missing anything. (I’d substitute The Worm Ouroboros–just as influential but actually readable, sort of.) I keep changing my list as I find more to read; it’s getting way out of control. Held og lykke med det!

    • Tak Jeanlp! Er du fra Danmark eller? Yeah, I’ve actually tried to read Mervyn Peake too and disliked the book so much that I gave it away – I never do that… But since, I’ve read a lot about it and what he was inspired by so I would like to give it another go. Never heard of The Worm Ouroboros – will check that out, although sort of readable isn’t the best recommendation ;-)

      • Jeg var engang udvekslingstudent på Fyn–men det var jo lang siden. Ouroboros is another cornerstone of British fantasy literature and influenced Tolkien especially–but an easy read it is not. :)

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